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Full text of "Bulletin, Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, February, 1970"



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of the University 
of Virginia 

SUMMER CATALOGUE 1970 




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of Virginia 



SUMMER CATALOGUE 1970 







COLLEGE CALENDAR 

SUMMER SESSION 1970 

Residence halls open June 14 

Registration June 15 

Classes begin June 1 6 

Holiday , July 4 

Reading Day August 5 

Final examinations August 6, 7, 8 



Volume I February 1970 Number 3 

Mary Washington College Bulletin, Summer Catalogue Issue, Volume 1, 
Number 3, February, 1970. Published Monthly except August and November 
by Mary Washington College, Fredericksburg, Virginia, 22401. Second Class 
Postage Paid at the Post Office, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 



College Calendar 2 

General Information 5 

Admissions and Finances 17 

Student Life 23 

Course Offerings 27 

Directory 37 

Schedule of Classes 43 



Table of 
Contents 



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The Summer Session 

The summer session at Mary Washington College is designed to 
fulfill a number of objectives. It allows students to accelerate their 
academic programs, either at Mary Washington or at other colleges, 
or to make up deficiencies. It also provides an opportunity for 
teachers to renew professional certificates, to take additional work 
toward a degree, or add to or update their competence in a specific 
academic discipline. In addition to beginning-level courses, the 
summer session also offers advanced specialized study in most 
fields and permits a student majoring in a given area the op- 
portunity to further enrich her knowledge of the field. Some of the 
course work is especially suited to the summer season and could 
not effectively be offered at another time of the year. 

Standards of work in the summer session are the same as those 
during the regular session, but concentrated presentation, smaller 
classes, and longer class hours allow a student to finish in eight 
weeks the work normally covered in a semester of sixteen weeks. 
The usual student load is from eight to ten credit hours or from 
two to three classes daily, including laboratories. 

The summer session class meets for sixty-minutes daily, with no 
regular classes scheduled on Saturday. The final three days of the 
summer session are devoted to final examinations. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



8 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Introduction 

Mary Washington College is a state-aided liberal arts college for 
women and a part of the University of Virginia. As such, it has 
an obligation to the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia to 
provide, without regard to race, creed or national origins, the 
best education for those students who give promise of succeeding 
in college. 

As a liberal arts college, Mary Washington stands firmly in 
the tradition that a broad education in the arts, the sciences, 
and the humanities, complemented by intensive study in a particular 
field of interest, is a most appropriate preparation for life and 
citizenship. 

Asa college for women, Mary Washington endeavors to provide 
the best intellectual background possible for the woman of today. 
It recognizes the importance of the inquiring mind, the significance 
of aesthetic sensitivity and the necessity of individual and corporate 
responsibility. 

Finally, as a part of the University of Virginia, Mary Washington 
College has a unique role to fill in Virginia education, and is 
pledged to the selection of a qualified student body, to the mainte- 
nance of a competent faculty and staff, and to the development of 
the academic and social environment necessary to achieve its goals. 

Mary Washington College is fully accredited by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is a member of 
the Southern University Conference, the American Council on 
Education, the Association of American Colleges, the Association 
of Virginia Colleges, the College Entrance Examination Board, 
the National Commission on Accrediting, the Southern Association 
of Colleges for Women, the University Center in Virginia, and 
the National Association of Schools of Music. 




Mary Washington College is a corporate member of the Ameri- 
can Association of University Women which is affiliated with the 
International Federation of University Women (IFUW). Graduates 
are eligible for membership in the national and international 
organizations. There is a local branch of the A AUW in Fredericks- 
burg. 



History 

Founded as the Fredericksburg Normal and Industrial School 
for Women in 1908, Mary Washington College has experienced a 
growth closely paralleling the development of education for women 
in the State of Virginia. The cooridination of the College with the 
University of Virginia was the culmination of efforts by the women 
of Virginia to gain educational opportunities comparable to those 
provided by the State for men. 

By the beginning of this century the Virginia General Assembly 
began a move to provide a more adequate education for the young 
women in the state. This resulted in the establishment of two 
normal schools, one in Fredericksburg and the other in Harrison- 
burg. 

In 1909 the State made an appropriation of $25,000 for the 
purchase of land in or near Fredericksburg. A sixty-acre site on 
Marye's Heights overlooking the city was subsequently chosen. 

By 1924 the normal school had developed beyond its original 
mission and as a result of action by the General Assembly, the 
College then became the State Teachers' College, Fredericksburg. 

The curriculum was divided into a two-year and a four-year 
program. Those students successfully completing the four-year 
program received a B.S. degree in education plus the regular state 
collegiate professional certificate, while those completing the two- 
year program earned a normal professional or special teacher's 
certificate. 

A further change occurred in 1935 when, in recognition of the 
necessity for providing a balanced education for women that was 
not oriented solely toward the teaching profession, the College 
was given the additional privilege of conferring degrees in the 
liberal arts, as well as in the professional, vocational, and technical 
fields. From this point on, the College was in fact a state college 
for women. 

This shift in emphasis led in turn to the third change of name 
for the Fredericksburg institution— to Mary Washington College— 
by act of the General Assembly in 1938. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



10 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



The fourth major change occurred in 1944 when a bill was 
brought before the state legislature to make Mary Washington 
College the undergraduate college of arts and sciences for women 
of the University of Virginia. 

With the establishment of Mary Washington College as the 
women's college of the University, emphasis was placed upon the 
liberal arts. Courses that were regarded as primarily vocational 
were either eliminated or continued on a non-credit basis. By 
1948 the initial transition was completed. 

Since that time, academic growth has continued. A number of 
changes have been implemented to emphasize further Mary Wash- 
ington College's role as a liberal arts college for women; as the 
needs for women in liberal arts have changed, so too has the 
College. 

One of the few state-aided liberal arts colleges for women in 
America, Mary Washington draws its students from almost every 
state— and enrolls a number of students from foreign countries. 

The name— Mary Washington College of the University of Vir- 
ginia— combines historic significance and background with local 
associations. Within sight of the hill on which the College is 
located are the home and tomb of Mary Washington; and Ken- 
more, the home of her daughter, Betty Washington Lewis. The 
College grounds were at one time a part of the Lewis estate. 




Location and Environment 

The Mary Washington College campus, which also includes the 
historic Brompton estate, comprises 381 acres situated on Marye's 
Heights overlooking the city of Fredericksburg and the Rappa- 
hannock Valley. Immediately adjacent to the Fredericksburg and 
Spotsylvania National Military Park, the grounds were the site 
of the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg; long before that, it is 
said, a portion of the area was an Indian village. 

The City of Fredericksburg has now enveloped the College 
property, which has, however, remained an integral unit, un- 
broken by the urban development. Some thirty-three buildings are 
located on the campus and, in addition, there are a golf course, 

athletic fields and tennis courts, swimming pool, and an outdoor 
amphitheatre. Though the buildings are widely situated on the 
spacious wooded grounds, they are within easy walking distance 
of one another. 

The downtown business district of Fredericksburg and other 
more recently constructed shopping centers are within convenient 
walking distance of the campus. 



Fredericksburg is situated halfway between Washington, D.C. 
(55 miles), and Richmond, Virginia (55 miles), and is easily 
accessible from the north or south on Interstate Highway 95 or 
U. S. Route 1, or from the east or west on U. S. Route 17 or 
Virginia Route 3. Bus transportation (Greyhound or Trailways) 
and rail transportation (Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac 
Railroad) are also readily accessible. The closest commercial airlines 
facilities are at the National Airport and Dulles International 
Airport, both serving Washington, D. C. , and each an hour's 
ride from the College; or at Byrd Airport in Richmond, only 
slightly further away. 

Fredericksburg is a city of 15,000 with modern shopping and 
tourist facilities. There exists a very cordial relationship between 
the College and the community, and the students are a part of 
this relationship whether as shoppers, or part-time employees at 
local businesses or as members of local church congregations. 

The City and surrounding area have played an important role in 
American history from the time Captain John Smith and his 
followers sailed up the Rappahannock River in 1608 until the 
present. 

Sometimes called "America's Most Historic City" , Fredericks- 
burg is identified with much of the nation's history. Americans 
such as Alexander Spotswood, George Washington, James Monroe, 
James Madison, and John Paul Jones were closely associated with 
the city, as were many other colonial history-makers. 

In addition, four major engagements of the Civil War were 
fought in the Fredericksburg area— all encompassing Marye's 
Heights where the College is located— and the reminders of 
America's heritage are still clearly present. 

Brompton, now a part of the College grounds and the residence 
of its Chancellor, was once headquarters for the Confederate 
forces defending the City and center of the Federal attack in 
both the first and second battles of Fredericksburg. Also located 
on the College grounds is a memorial to Confederate Sergeant 
Richard Kirkland of South Carolina, a hero of the Battle of 
Fredericksburg. The memorial was created by sculptor Felix 
deWeldon and dedicated in 1965. 

Thousands of interested Americans and foreign visitors come 
to Fredericksburg each year to re-live history by touring these 
important landmarks. As an accomodation the City operates 
Information Centers on Interstate Highway 95 and at the corner of 
U. S. Route 1 and Princess Anne Street in the City. 




11 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




12 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Buildings and Accommodations 

The physical facilities at Mary Washington College may best be 
described as neo-classical in the Jeffersonian tradition. The red 
brick, white-columned buildings have been situated in an orderly 
manner on the campus, utilizing as much as possible the existing 
natural surroundings. The thirty-three structures include eighteen 
residence halls and nine academic buildings. Those buildings to 
be utilized during the summer session are described below. 



Academic Buildings 

Chandler Hall. Named in memory of Algernon B. Chandler, Jr., 
president of the College from 1919 until his death in 1928, this 
building contains offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, and labora- 
tories for English, home economics, and psychology. 
Combs Science Hall. Honoring the late Morgan L. Combs, 
President of the College from 1929 to 1955, this modern, four- 
story science complex was opened for use in September 1959. It 
provides lecture rooms, offices, laboratories, and other facilities 
for instruction in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geography, 
geology, mathematics, and physics. It has adequate space to make 
possible continued expansion of course offerings in these fields. 
A botanical greenhouse addition is currently being planned and 
is scheduled tor use during the 1970-71 session. 
Fine Arts Center. The Fine Arts Center contains three separate 
buildings connected by arcades: Jessie Ball duPont Hall, Gari 
Melchers Hall, and John Garland Pollard Hall. 




duPont Hall. The central building of the group constituting the 
fine arts complex is named in honor of Jessie Ball duPont (Mrs. 
Alfred I.) of Wilmington, Delaware, and Ditchley, Virginia, 
in recognition of her interest and generosity to the College. She 
is also a direct descendent of Mary Ball Washington for whom 
the college is named. This central unit contains exhibit rooms, 

classrooms, a broadcasting studio, and language laboratories. It 
also houses a theatre with a seating capacity of 300, rehearsal 
rooms, make-up rooms, and a scenery loft. Classes in dramatic 
arts and speech and modern foreign languages use these facilities. 
Melchers Hall. The south building of the complex is named in 
honor of the late Gari Melchers, internationally known artist, 
whose home, Belmont, in nearby Falmouth, is now a memorial 
under the trusteeship of the College. Melchers Hall is devoted to 
such arts as painting, sculpture, and ceramics, and contains class- 
rooms, studios, kilns, offices, and workrooms. Housed here also 
is the fast-growing and carefully selected slide library for use in 
the art history classes. 

Pollard Hall. The north building, bearing the name of the late 
John Garland Pollard, Governor of Virginia, Attorney-General, 
college professor, and patron of the arts, is devoted exclusively to 
music. It contains studios for individual instruction, band practice 
rooms, and offices. 

Monroe Hall. This structure was named for President James 
Monroe, who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely 
identified with the community. It contains classrooms and offices 
for the departments of classics, economics and political science, 
education, history, and religion. It has an assembly hall with a 
seating capacity of about 200. 



13 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



14 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



E. Lee Trinkle Library. Named in honor of the late E. Lee 
Trinkle, former Governor of Virginia and for many years Presi- 
dent of the State Board of Education, once the governing board of 
the College, the library contains more than 200,000 volumes. 

It is a large air-conditioned facility and provides ample study 
and reading space for all students. An open-stack system permits 
the students to browse and work directly with the books. Typing 
rooms, individual study cubicles, microfilm readers, coin-operated 
xerox facilities, and a hook-up on a state-wide library teletype 
system for inter-library lending are a few of the services and 
facilities available. 

In an effort to maintain accurate and up-to-date material for 
classroom and research purposes the library subscribes to and 
catalogues nearly 900 periodicals and newspapers. This list in- 
cludes 132 foreign and 710 domestic periodicals and 7 foreign 
and 21 domestic newspapers. 

In addition, the library is a depository for other selected 
government documents; it maintains a record collection as well 
as a music manuscript collection. 

In 1964, the library opened a rare books room which pro- 
vides ready access to a growing collection of first editions and 
books of particular rarity. Special attention is currently being 
given to books by and about James Joyce and the nineteenth 
century French physiologist, Claude Bernard, as well as to books 
on eighteenth century architecture, landscaping and gardening. 

George Washington Hall. This facility is named in honor of George 
Washington, whose life was closely associated with Fredericksburg 
and this section of Virginia. It contains the administrative offices, 
classroom and office facilities for the philosophy department, the 
telephone exchange for the College, the internal mail facility and 
central duplication services for the College. It also contains the 
largest auditorium on the campus with a seating capacity of more 
than 1 ,600. 

Goolrick Hall. The newest building on the campus has been named 
for the late C. O' Conor Goolrick, who, as a member of the 
General Assembly of Virginia, sponsored the 1908 legislation 
establishing the College. It contains all of the facilities and 
equipment necessary for a complete physical education program. 
There are, for example, an indoor swimming pool, a large gym- 
nasium and auxiliary gym, a handball court, dance studios, sun 
decks, and an exercise room. In addition, the several academic 
departments have offices and classrooms in the building. 



Other Buildings 

Brompton. Brompton is the home of the Chancellor of the 
College and is situated on a 174- acre site near the main campus. 
The first unit of the colonial brick mansion is believed to have 
been erected about 1730. It was enlarged and completed in 1836 
by Colonel John L. Marye and restored, after purchase by the 
College, in 1946. 

In a report by historians for the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 
National Military Park, it is stated that "no other house on the 
American continent is more important or better known in con- 
nection with military history, and few other homes are better 
examples of their type". 

Also located on this tract of land, which comprises the major 
portion of the original estate, is the College nine-hole golf course. 
Belmont. Located in Falmouth across the Rappahannock River 
from Fredericksburg, Belmont is the estate where Gari Melchers, 
the noted American artist, lived and worked during the last 
sixteen years of his distinguished career. As a memorial to her 
husband, Mrs. Corinne Lawton Mackall Melchers deeded Belmont 
and many of his paintings to the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
The property is now administered by Mary Washington College. 
Many of the Melchers paintings may be seen in the College 
offices and other buildings. 

Hamlet House. Named after a former Professor at the College, 
this frame structure now serves as the Counseling Center at the 
College. 

Ann Carter Lee Hall. Popularly known as the "Student Activities" 
building, this structure bears the name of the mother of Robert 
E. Lee. It provides such recreational areas as a ballroom, recep- 
tions rooms, television facilities, informal lounges, the College 
book store, and the "C Shoppe", a campus snack bar. It also 
contains an indoor swimming pool and bowling alleys. Located 
here is the office of the Director of Student Affairs, as are the 
offices of the major student organizations. 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary. Named for Dr. Hugh Mercer, a physician 
of Fredericksburg and a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary 
War, the infirmary is a modern, thirty-seven bed medical facility. 
Every room is provided with private or connecting bath. There 
are also isolation wards, a solarium, a sun deck, a dining room 
and kitchen. 

It is maintained on a twenty-four hour a day basis by a staff 
of nurses, and a staff of physicians residing in the community 
are available at all times. 



15 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




16 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




Seacobeck Hall. A Seacobeck Indian village once occupied the 
present site of the campus dining hall. It has a central kitchen, 
five main dining areas, and a reception room. It also is equipped 
with its own bakery, ice plant and storage facilities. 
Spotswood House. Originally built as a home and used for a 
time as a small residence hall, this frame building located opposite 
the main entrance to the College is now occupied by the Alumnae 
Association. Alexander Spotswood was a colonial governor of Vir- 
ginia. 

Amphitheatre. The outdoor amphitheatre is set on the slope of 
a hill in a natural grove of trees and has a seating capacity of 
approximately 1 ,500. It is the site of the annual May Festival at 
the College. 

Post Office. The College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg 
Post Office, is located on College Avenue, across the street from 
the main campus, and provides individual mail boxes for students 
in addition to other postal services. 

Residential Buildings 

All residence halls at Mary Washington College provide com- 
fortable housing, with ample ventilation and light. All major 
halls have reception parlors, recreation rooms, pressing facilities, 
washers and driers, kitchenettes, and storage facilities. Two of 
the newer residence halls are scheduled for use during the summer 
session. 



Students Eligible for Admission to Summer Session 

The College admits to its summer session: 

(a) High school graduates who have been accepted for fall 
admission but plan to enter college in June instead of waiting 
until September, and thus save much valuable time and expense; 

(b) Students regularly enrolled in college who desire to continue 
their studies in the summer in order to complete their degree 
programs in three calendar years instead of four; 

(c) Those who need to make up required work or to com- 
pensate for loss of time due to illness or some other reason; 

(d) Students in good standing at other accredited colleges; 

(e) Teachers who wish to renew or raise certificates or to take 
additional work toward a degree. 

Men and women are eligible for admission to the summer 
session. Men, however, are admitted only as non-residential 
students and mDst reside in their own homes or the homes of 
immediate relatives in the Fredericksburg area. 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may be 
admitted as special students without satisfying the usual entrance 
requirements, provided they give evidence of serious purpose 
and show adequate preparation for the courses they wish to enter. jg 

Acceptance for the summer session does not imply acceptance 

for admission to the regular session of the College. ADMISSIONS 

Directions for Admission 

Students who wish to enroll for the summer session should 
file an application with the Director of Admissions, preferably 
not later than June 16. An application is contained in this 
bulletin. 

An application fee of ten dollars is required for enrollment in 
the summer session. This fee is credited toward charges for the 
summer session, but it is not refundable. 

Students currently in other colleges or who plan to enroll in 
other colleges must present a certificate of good standing in order 
to enroll for summer courses at Mary Washington College. A 
form for this purpose is contained in this bulletin. A former 
Mary Washington College student who has been enrolled else- 
where during the past session will be required to furnish ap- 
propriate academic records when requested to do so by the 
Director of Admissions. 
Registration 

Students admitted to the summer session will register for classes 
on Monday, June 15 , from nine until twelve o'clock noon. Stu- 
dents with last names beginning with A through L will register 



between the hours of 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.; students with last 
names beginning with M through Z will register between the 
hours of 10:30 and 12:00 noon. The location of registration will 
be announced at a later date. 

Expenses for the Summer Session 

Virginia Non-Virginia 
Students Students 



20 



FINANCES 




Tuition None 175.00 

General college fees 150.00 150.00 

Student activity fee 6.75 6.75 

Residential fee 99.50 99.50 

Board 96.25 96.25 

Total 352.50 527.50 

Part- Time Students 

Minimum charge (1 to 3 hours' credit), $70.00. For each 
semester hour's credit above the minimum, $23.00. A student 
who is not a legal resident of the State of Virginia will be charged 
a non-resident tuition fee of $28.00 per semester hour credit, in 
addition to the above charges. Students enrolling for courses with 
individual instruction in music or art will be charged an addi- 
tional $50.00 for each such course. The fee for students enrolled 
in French or German for Graduate Reading Examinations will 
also be $50.00. 

No student will be admitted on a part-time basis who registers 
for more than four semester hours of credit. Unless special ar- 
rangements are made in advance, part-time students are not 
eligible for residential space and are not entitled to the benefits 
of student activity functions, college medical and nursing staff 
services, or dining hall services. 

Other Fees 

Individual Instruction In Riding. The fee for one credit hour 
of individual instruction in riding is $62.50. The fee for recreational 
riding without credit, two hours a week, is $37.50; for unlimited 
riding, for recreation or credit, $75.00; riding by the hour, 
$3.00. These fees are payable directly to Grey Horse Stables, 
Inc. Written permission of a parent or guardian must be pre- 
sented before enrollment is considered complete. 

Books and Supplies. Books and Supplies are available at the 
College book store. These cannot be included in a student's 
college account, but must be paid for in cash at the time of 
purchase. 



MlMfii 




Classification as a Virginia Student. 

In order to be considered a Virginia student for any given 
semester, it is necessary that the applicant shall have been 
domiciled in the State of Virginia for at least one year im- 
mediately preceding the beginning of that semester, and the ap- 
plicant or her parents must have been bona fide taxpayers to the 
State of Virginia for the calendar year immediately preceding the 
calendar year of registration. 

Residence in the State for the purpose of securing an education 
does not qualify an individual for classification as a Virginia 
student. For tuition purposes, the legal residence of a student is 
considered to be the same as that of her father or legal guardian. 

Financial Assistance 

Mary Washington College has available a limited number of 
scholarships and student aid positions in the summer session. 
They are awarded on the basis of ability and need. Loan funds 
are also available for residents of Virginia. 

The college participates in the Teachers' Scholarship Program 
sponsored by the Virginia State Department of Education. Pro- 
rated summer scholarships are authorized for students com- 
pleting their degrees in three regular sessions and three summer 
sessions. 

Information regarding scholarships and student aid positions 
maybe obtained from the Office of the Director of Financial Aid. 

The division superintendents of schools in Virginia are authorized 
to recommend teachers for scholarship loans provided by the State 
to attend summer schools in non-sectarian degree-granting Vir- 
ginia colleges. The loans and interest can be cancelled by teaching 
in Virginia public schools. Application must be filed with the 
State Department of Education before April 1 . 

Full information regarding this type of summer school scholar- 
ship and the necessary application forms may be obtained from 
the division superintendent of schools under whom the applicant 
has taught or will teach. 




21 



FINANCES 



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Introduction 

Although the summer school study proceeds at a rapid rate, 
an upper limit on the course load insures that the student will 
have ample time for intensive individual study as well as for 
recreation. In addition, small classes make possible a good deal 
of attention to the individual needs of the students. Students en- 
rolling at the College for the first time are given some orientation. 
They are required, however, to take part also in the general 
orientation program in September, if they continue their studies 
at Mary Washington College. During the summer session members 
of the administration and faculty are available to provide assistance 
to any student. Questions dealing with the academic program 
should initially be directed to the Office of the Dean of the 
College or the Director of the Summer Session, while residential 
problems should be taken to the Office of the Dean of Students. 

Students, except those living in their own homes and attending 
as day students, will be expected to reside on the campus. Every 
student must provide a certificate from her family physician in- 
dicating the results of a recent physical examination. 

The College strives to create and maintain an atmosphere of 
friendliness and helpfulness on the part of students and faculty. 
It is expected that students will at all times uphold the standards, 
traditions, and regulations of the College and that parents will 
cooperate in these matters. A student is likewise held responsible 
for the conduct of her guests on campus. 

The College administration reserves the right to request any 
student to withdraw whose conduct or general attitude is con- 
sidered unsatisfactory, even though no specific charge is made 
against her. 

Honor System 

Mary Washington College adheres to an honor system ad- 
ministered and enforced solely by the students. This authority 
is delegated to the students by the Board of Visitors of the 
University of Virginia. 

The Honor System provides that a student shall act honorably 
in all aspects of campus life. Lying, cheating, stealing, or breaking 
one's word of honor are considered infringements of the Honor 
System. Whenever a violation of the Honor System is proved, 
the result is always immediate and permanent separation from 
the College. 

Every student entering the College for the first time is given 
a copy of the entire Code of the Honor System. After she has 
familiarized herself with its provisions and is certain of its 
meaning and obligations, she signs a pledge stating that she 



25 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



k 



understands what is expected of her and that she realizes that a 
plea of ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council. 
Registration as a student in the College is not considered complete, 
and no grades or credits will be released until this card has been 
signed. 

Organizations 

Though most clubs and campus organizations are inactive 
during the summer session, a limited number of organizational 
activities are available. 

The Student Government Association, through elected and ap- 
pointed representatives, continues its shared responsibility for stu- 
dent life and conduct. 



26 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Social Privileges 

General social privileges are granted in keeping with college 
policies, student government regulations, and the parental form 
returned to the Office of the Dean of Students. A married 
student must apply in advance to the Dean of Students for 
special permission to be in residence. 

Automobiles 

All student vehicles must be registered in the Office of the 
Director of Student Affairs and registration stickers displayed. 
Explicit rules governing registration, parking penalties, etc. are 
printed in a pamphlet available at the same office. 



Recreational Opportunities 

Mary Washington College offers many opportunities for rec- 
reation during the summer. An indoor swimming pool, tennis 
courts, and a nine-hole golf course are all operated by the 
College. Horseback riding is available at Grey Horse Stables, 
not far from the campus, and instruction may be taken either 
with or without credit. The Department of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation also offers instruction in golf, swim- 
ming, and tennis. 

Informal dances and other social events are regularly scheduled 
on Friday evenings during the summer session; a program of 
moving pictures to be presented either Friday or Saturday evenings 
will also be available. In addition, the Department of Dramatic 
Arts and Speech will present two plays during the session. 










... , ..;ik 



Lf. „ -•.•:!£ 



Introduction 

The College offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science in most fields of the humanities 
and sciences, as well as cooperative programs in a number of 
special fields. (For a description of the requirements for degrees 
and of special programs, consult the General Catalogue.) 

The courses listed below will be offered during the 1970 sum- 
mer session. The College reserves the right, however, especially 
with courses noted as "contingency courses," not to offer them if 
enrollment is insufficient. 

Eight to ten semester hours' credit may be earned in the 
summer session. Except as indicated, each semester of a course 
carries a credit of three semester hours. If both semesters are 
completed, the credit is usually six semester hours. In the listing 
of courses below as "three or six credits," the determining factor 
is whether the student takes one or both semesters. 







Five- Day Schedule 

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday. The schedule of 
classes will be: 

First Period 8-00—9:00 

Second Period 9:15—10:15 

Third Period 10:30-11:30 

Fourth Period 11:45-12:45 

Fifth Period 2:00- 3:00 

Sixth Period 3:15- 4:15 

Laboratories, special institutes and occasionally other courses 
may be scheduled later in the afternoon and possibly in the 
evening. 



29 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



ART 



Art 111 — Introduction to Art History. 

Emphasis on a selected number of specific monuments of Western Art, 
including examples from architecture, sculpture, and painting. These will be 
considered from the standpoint of the developmental principles involved, 
their relationships to other works more freely selected by the individual 
instructor, and the probable aesthetic and cultural factors relevant to their 
creation. Three credits. 



Art 216— Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art. 

A study of the stylistic and technical developments necessary to an under- 
standing of modern art. Three credits. 



Art 452— Twentieth Century Art. 

A survey of the architecture, painting and sculpture of Europe and the 
United States. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Courses in Studio Art to be scheduled. 



BIOLOGY 

Biology 121- 122— Biological Concepts. 

General biological principles as they apply to plants and animals. Eight 
credits. 



30 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 




*Biology 251 — The Social Implications of Biology. 

Prerequisite: One year of college biology or by permission of the instructor. 
A course designed to relate some of the classic and recent principles and 
theories of biology to their effect upon society. The student should learn to 
read and properly interpret research reports and be able to discuss their 
social implications. Three credits. Miss Johnson. 

Biology 352- Marine Biology. 

Prerequisite: at least a year of college Biology. The study of marine 
organisms in their natural habitats, with particular stress on their ecology, 
phylogeny and behavior. Frequent field collections will include seining, 
dredging and trawling in the bay and its tributaries. Several more extensive 
field trips will include collecting in the open ocean and visits to various 
marine research facilities on the bay. Individual student interests and research 
projects will be an integral part of the course. The last two weeks will be 
devoted to an independent research project chosen by the student. Six 
weeks. Six credits. Offered the first six weeks of the summer session at the 
Cross Rip Camp, Deltaville, Virginia. Mr. Pinschmidt. 

Biology 353— Independent Study in Marine Biology. 

Prerequisite: Biology 352 or equivalent and permission of the instructor. 
The student is expected to carry out an indepth study of a specific aspect 
of marine biological research based on a carefully outlined plan of study. 
Both a written report and an oral report will be presented at the conclusion 
of the study. Two weeks. Two credits. Offered the fifth and sixth weeks 
of the summer session at the Cross Rip Camp, Deltaville, Virginia. Mr. 
Pinschmidt. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 111-112— General Chemistry. 

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles 
of chemistry and the more important elements and their compounds. Eight 
credits. 

♦Offering contingent upon sufficient enrollment. 



Chemistry 251, 252- Analytical Chemistry. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111-112. The first semester consists 
of an elaboration of the principles of chemistry with particular emphasis 
on chemical equilibrium. In the accompanying qualitative analysis laboratory, 
semi-micro techniques are employed. The second semester consists of the 
theory and techniques of volumetric quantitative analysis. Four credits each 
semester. 

DRAMATIC ARTS 

Dramatic Arts 211, 212— World Drama. 

A survey of actors, theatres, and selected plays in primitive, ancient, 
and modern civilizations. Theatre excursions may be arranged. Three credits 
each semester. 




Dramatic Arts 333-334— Workshop in Theatre Production. 

Practical application of stagecraft and acting to production. Scenery, 
lighting and costuming for Summer Theatre productions. Acting styles and 
directing methods for the one-act play in the Studio Theatre. Six credits. 

Dramatic Arts 443— Children's Theatre. 

Staging and production of plays for children. Dramatization of original 
and adapted literature. Creative dramatics. Three credits. 



31 



EDUCATION 

Education 420— Foundations of Education. 

An analysis of the role of education in the United States. Major emphasis 
in this course are upon the surveys of the contributions of the foundation 
disciplines to theory and practice in American schools: history of education, 
cultural anthropology, sociology, philosophy, psychology of learning, political 
science and economics. Three credits. 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Education 430 — Human Relations in Education. 

A workshop-type course designed to study intensively some major problems 
of human relations in education today, with emphasis upon practical 
techniques that can be helpful in dealing with typical situations. Participants 
will have an opportunity to work as individuals or committees in areas of 
particular interest to them, such as intergroup relations, classroom interaction 
processes, minority groups, controversial issues, the disadvantaged student, 
and the dynamics of group learning. Problems and procedures at both 
elementary and secondary levels will be explored as the interests and concerns 
of members of the class indicate. Three credits. 



Education 440 — Supervised Teaching. 

Orientation to teaching, under direction of supervisors in public secondary 
schools; practical experience in classroom, laboratory, and field activities, 
as well as other aspects of the total school program. Six credits. 




32 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Registration for this work must be made in advance through the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

The Departments of Education and History, in cooperation with the 
Virginia State Department of Education and the School of General Studies, 
University of Virginia, will offer an institute in American History. Participants 
will be selected from persons possessing the following qualifications: (1) 
Presently teaching course in American History in a secondary school. (2) 
At least one (1) year of teaching experience, including experience in teaching 
United States History in grades 8 through 12. (3) Desire and likelihood of 
continued teaching at this level. (4) Demonstrated ability to accomplish work 
of good quality in advanced-undergraduate/graduate study. Inclusive dates: 
June 22 to August 31. 9 credits (graduate credit will be available through 
the University of Virginia, School of General Studies) 

ENGLISH 

English 111 — Composition and Reading. 

The mechanics of writing and an introduction to literature. To earn credit 
for the course, the student must have a passing average in her theme 
program. Three credits. 

English 231 - Short Fiction. 

A study of selected short stories and short novels. Three credits. 

English 233 —Poetry. 

A close analysis of poetic form and content. Three credits. 

English 335— Nineteenth Century English Literature. 
Romantic poetry and prose. Three credits. 

English 355 — Nineteenth Century American Literature. 
Literary romanticism in American prose and poetry. Three credits. 

English 356 — Nineteenth Century American Literature. 
Literary realism in American prose and poetry. Three credits. 

*English 375 — American Negro Literature. 

Study of Black poetry, drama and prose in America with special emphasis 
on major authors. 

*English 486 — Special Studies in American Poetry, Twentieth Century. 

Intensive investigation of significant twentieth century American poets. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 212— World Geography. 

A study of the world by regions, with emphasis on the cultural differences 
among nations. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 322— Geography of Anglo- A merica. 

A survey of the United States and Canada by regions. (New England, 
the South, French Canada, etc.) including the culture, population, industry, 
trade, and natural foundation of each. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

*Offered contingent upon sufficient enrollment. 



Geography 334- Geography of South America. 

A study of landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, resources and cultural 
groupings of South America. Three credits. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

Health Education 100-Health. 

Activities Classes to be scheduled. 

HISTORY 



History 221 — Colonial America. 

The discovery, exploration, and settlement of North America and the 
development of the British Colonies to 1763. Three credits. 

History 222— The American Revolution and the Early National Period. 

Independence, the creation of the United States and its development 
through the Jackson period. Three credits. 

*History 305— The Frontier in American History. 

The westward movement and the significance of the Frontier, emphasizing 
the Turnerian thesis. Three credits. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 111-112— Mathematical Analysis. 

This course includes topics from set theory, logic, mathematical foundations, 
college algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and an introduction to 
calculus. Six credits. 

*Mathematics 206— Elementary Statistics: 

An introduction to basic probability and statistics including probability 
distributions and hypothesis testing. Among the topics offered will be: 
z-test, t-test, chi square, analysis of variance, regression and correlation. 
Three credits. 



33 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Mathematics 21l-2\2-Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111-112. Differential and integral calculus. Six 
credits. 

*Mathematics 312— Differential Equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Ordinary differential equations with 
applications and an introduction to partial differential equations. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 

*French for Graduate Reading Examinations. 

An intensive non-credit course in reading French will be offered in the 
evenings to individuals working on graduate degrees. It will be designed to 
prepare the individual for foreign language examinations given to fulfill 
requirements toward a Masters or Ph.D. degree. 

♦Offering contingent upon sufficient enrollment. 




34 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



French 103-104— Intermediate French. 

Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two to three units of high school French. 
Grammar review; varied readings; oral and written work with emphasis on 
vocabulary building. Six credits. 



French 201-202— Introduction to French Literature. 
Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units of high school French, 
readings from all periods of French literature. Six credits. 



Selected 



*French 407-408— French Conversation. 

Prerequisite: French 203-204 and advanced standing in French. Required 
C'f majors unless excused after examination by the department. Two credits. 

German 

*German for Graduate Reading Examination. 

An intensive non-credit course in reading German will be offered in the 
evenings to individuals working on graduate degrees. It will be designed to 
prepare the individual for foreign language examinations given to fulfill 
requirements toward a Masters or Ph.D. degree. 

German 153-154— Intermediate German. 

Prerequisite: German 151-152 or two to three units of high school German. 
Grammar review and conversation; reading of modern German texts. Six 
credits. 

Spanish 

Spanish 121-122— Beginning Spanish. 

For students who enter College with fewer than two units of High 
School Spanish. Five hours a week, two of them in laboratory. Six credits. 



Spanish 123- 124— Intermediate Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 121-122 or two or three units of high school Spanish. 
Conversation and composition; varied readings; review of grammatical 
principles; practice in the language laboratory. Six credits. 

Spanish 219- 220- Introduction to Spanish-American Literature. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 123-124 or four units of high school Spanish. Selected 
readings from the works of great writers of various periods. Six credits. 



MUSIC 

Music 111,112- Survey of Music. 

General survey of music and its relationship to general culture and history. 
Three credits each semester. 



"Offering contingent upon sufficient enrollment. 



*Music 291— The History of Musical Instruments. 

A. study of the evolution of musical instruments in western culture from 
antiquity through the present day with emphasis on performance practices 
of the times and their relationships to the symphony orchestra. Two credits. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 101— Problems in Philosophy. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. An introduction to philosophical 
methods and concepts. Covers Ethics and Social Philosophy, Metaphysics 
and Theology. Three credits. 

Philosophy 111— Ethics. 

An introductory study of a variety of moral theories and an examination 
of terms used in moral assessment, with particular reference to such problems 
as the status and justification of moral judgments, and the nature of moral 
disagreement. Three credits. 

Philosophy 221— Introductory Logic. 

The elementary Principles of valid reasoning to introduce the arts and 
sciences student to logic and language, elementary symbolic logic and simple 
deductive systems. Three credits. 

Philosophy 304 — American Philosophy. 

A study of philosophical ideas in America from colonial times to their 
reorientation between World Wars I and II. Three credits. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 201, 202— American Government. 
The principles of government and politics as applied to national govern- 
ment, state governments, and other local units. Three credits each semester. 



35 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Political Science 301 —Comparative Government I. 
A comparative analysis of the government of the United Kingdom, 
and West Germany. 



France, 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 201-202— General Psychology. 

Fundamental principles of human behavior; biological antecedents; motiva- 
tion; perception; learning; individual differences; intelligence and personality. 
Three or six credits. 

Psychology 301— Social Psychology. 

The interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. 
Social influences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The develop- 
ment of change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small 
groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena. Three credits. 

♦Offering contingent upon sufficient enrollment. 





Psychology 311 — Abnormal Psychology. 

Abnormalities of sensation, perception, memory, thinking, emotion, intelli- 
gence, motor activity, and personality; study of neurotic and psychotic 
syndromes. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Psychology 331— Developmental Psychology: The Child. 

Study of the development of the individual from conception to adolescence. 
Emphasis is placed on physical, intellectual, emotional and social growth. 
Current research relevant to the field is given special attention. Three credits. 

Psychology 332— Developmental Psychology: The Adolescent. 

A survey of the major theories and research on adolescent development 
with special focus upon the dynamics of personality organization. An examina- 
tion of the various problems encountered during the adolescent years. Three 
credits. 



Psychology 362- Psychology of Exceptional Children. 

A study of exceptional children— the physically handicapped; the mentally 
retarded; the mentally gifted; and the emotional deviate. A survey of current 
attempts to provide programs to meet the specialized needs of such children. 
Three credits. 



36 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Psychology 401 — Psychological Tests and Measurements. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. Theory of test construction; development, 
interpretation, and uses of tests of general and special abilities; and the 
techniques of handling data. Three single and one two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Four credits. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 201— Principles of Sociology. 

A study of the basic characteristics of group life; development of society 
and culture; interaction between persons and groups. Three credits. 

Sociology 202-Social Problems. 

Social change; social and personal disorganizations; mobility; delinquency, 
crime; industrial and other group conflicts. Three credits. 



Sociology 313— Urban Society. 

Origin, character and significance of urban and metropolitan communities. 
Common problems of city living; ecological factors in growth of cities and 
their influence upon social behavior. Three credits. 

Sociology 402— Sociology of Child Development. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. The emergence of per- 
sonality with the child's socially defined roles in primary groups; social 
formation of attitudes through interaction with siblings, parents and peers. 
Three credits. 



The Corporation of the University 



38 



DIRECTORY 



Legal Title: 
"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia" 

The Rector of the University 
Frank W. Rogers 

The Visitors of the University 

C. Waller Barrett Charlottesville 

William M. Birdsong Suffolk 

Emma Ziegler Brown Richmond 

Richard S. Cross Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania 

J. Hartwell Harrison Boston 

W. Wright Harrison Virginia Beach 

Walkley E. Johnson Exmore 

Edwin L. Kendig, Jr Richmond 

J. Sloan Kuykendall Winchester 

Joseph H. McConnell Richmond 

Molly Vaughan Parrish Newport News 

William S. Potter Wilmington, Delaware 

Frank W. Rogers Roanoke 

Lewis M. Walker, Jr. Petersburg 

C. Stuart Wheatley, Jr Danville 

J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr Richmond 

Raymond C. Bice The Secretary of the Visitors 





39 



Administration 

Edgar Finley Shannon, Jr., A.B., A.M., D.Phil (Oxon.) , 

Litt.D., LL.D., D.Hum. President of the 

University of Virginia 

Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D 

Chancellor of Mary Washington College 

Michael Houston, B.A., M.A. Assistant to the Chancellor 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the 

College 

James H. Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Associate Dean 

of the College 

Laura Voelkel Sumner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Director of 

the Summer Session 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Comptroller 

Edward V. Allison, Jr., B.S Business Manager 

Mildred A. Droste, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Students 

A. R. Merchent, B.A., M.Ed v D.Ed Director of Admissions DIRECTORY 

Emily A. Holloway, B.S Director of Student Affairs 

Daniel Holt Woodward, B.A, M.A., Ph.D., B.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 

Mervin A. Frantz, B.S. Personnel Director 

A. Isabel Gordon Secretary of the Placement Bureau 

Franklin E. Hagy Executive Housekeeper 

Medford D. Haynes Chief, Campus Police 

Thomas P. Mann, B.A Director of Information Services 

Louis B. Massad, B.S., M.D Associate Physician 

Lawrence Moter, M.D. Associate Physician 

Ann L. Perinchief, B.A. Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Charles L. Read Manager, Bookstore 

David B. Rice, B.A., M.D Associate Physician 

Clement J. Robbins, III, B.S., M.D College Physician 

Pal Robison Food Service Director 

Jane N. Saladin, B.M.E., M.M Registrar and 

Director of Financial Aid 

Selma Shelton Manager, College Shop 

Inez F. Watson, R.N College Nurse 

Vincent H. Willetts Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds 
J. M. H. Willis, Jr., B.A., LL.B Legal Adviser 




40 



DIRECTORY 



Faculty of the Summer Session 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

James E. Baker, B.S., M.Ed. 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

Roger J. Bourdon, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Loyola University; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 
Ph.D., University of Los Angeles 

Marshall E. Bowen, B.Ed., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.Ed., Plymouth Teachers College; M.A., Kent State University 
Otho C. Campbell, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

B.A., Richmond College; M.A., The American University 

Theodore Celenko, Jr., B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Art 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Florida State University 

Harry L. Chipman, Jr., B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.S., Purdue University 

Herbert Lee Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Frances Linda deFlorio, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 
B.A., Smith College; M.A., Mount Holyoke College 

Ruth T. Friedman, B.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia 

Connie Ann Gallahan, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., Longwood College; M.S., University of Tennessee 

Donald D. Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

James B. Gouger, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Geography and Geology 

B.A., Montclair State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida 

Miriam Jean Greenberg, B.S., M.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Maryland 
Robert Allen Hodge, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Biology 

B.S., M.S., Kansas State Teacher's College 

Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 

A.B., Lynchburg College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



Robert B. Jessen, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Union College 

Rose Mary Johnson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 
A.B., Hood College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Constance A. Jones, B.A., M.A.T. 

Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., M.A.T., Vanderbilt University 

Mary A.K. Kelly, B.A., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., Ohio State University; Fulbright 
Scholar, University of London Institute of Psychiatry 

Harold Anton Michael Kirschner 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
Graduate of Offices' Training School, Copenhagen, Denmark 

Albert R. Klein, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
University of Denver 

John L. Lamph, A.A., B.A., M.A., M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 

A.A., Fullerton Junior College; B.A., M.A.. California State College at 

Fullerton; M.F.A., Claremont Graduate School ^\ 

Joanna M. Looney, A.B., M.A. nTPFPTOPV 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages uikxa* hjk. i 

A.B., Wesleyan College; M.A., Duke University 
Bruce David MacEwen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., LaVerne College; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., 
Arizona State University 

Bernard L. Mahoney, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

John C. Manolis, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Assumption University; M.A., Florida State University 
Galo Rene Perez, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Mejia National College; M.A., Ph.D., Central University of Ecuador 
William C. Pinschmidt, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Duke 

University 

Richard L. Sarchet, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southwestern State College; M.S., Oklahoma State University 
Edward F. Shaughnessy, Jr., B.S., Ed.M., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Boston College; ED.M., Boston State College; M.A., Northeastern 

University 





42 



DIRECTORY 



Raman K. Singh, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., St. Stephen's College; M.A., Western Michigan University 

Raiford E. Sumner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., 
Louisiana State University 

Glen R. Thomas, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.A., The American University 

Thomas S. Turgeon, B.A., D.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 
B.A., Amherst College; D.F.A. , Yale University 

Joseph Carroll Vance, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

George M. Van Sant, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Judith Knoff Warner, B.A., M.A. 

Acting Instructor of Modern Foreign Languages 
B.A., Upsala College; M.A., New York University 

Roy B. Weinstock, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Hollins College; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Richard M. Zeleznock, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California State College; M.A., Rutgers University 




Summer Session Schedule Of Classes 



ART 

Art 111 11:45-12:45 
Art 216 10:30-11:30 
Art 452 9:15—10:15 

Studio Art to be scheduled 



BIOLOGY 

Biology 121 (First Semester) 8:00-12:45 

Biology 122 (Second Semester) 8:00-12:45 

Biology 251 10:30-11:30 



2:00-3:00 
2:00-3:00 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 111-112 
Chemistry 251-252 



8:00-12:45 
8:00-12:45 



2:00-3:00 
2:00-3:00 



DRAMATIC ARTS 

Dramatic Arts 211 
Dramatic Arts 212 
Dramatic Arts 333-334 
Dramatic Arts 443 



EDUCATION 

Education 420 
Education 430 
Education 440 



9:15-10:15 
10:30-11:30 

2:00- 4:15 
11:45-12:45 



43 



SCHEDULE 
OF CLASSES 



2:00-3:00 
3:15-4:15 
To be arranged 



ENGLISH 

English 11 1A 
English 11 IB 
English 231 
English 233 
English 335 
English 355 
English 356 
English 375 
English 486 



8:00- 9:00 

3:15- 4:15 

9:15-10:15 

2:00- 3:00 

11:45-12:45 

9:15-10:15 

10:30-11:30 

10:30-11:30 

2:00- 3:00 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 212 2:00- 3:00 

Geography 322 9:15-10:15 

Geography 334 11:45-12:45 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Health 8:00-9:00 



HISTORY 

History 221 8:00- 9:00 

History 222 9:15-10:15 

History 355 10:30-11:30 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 1 1 1 2:00- 3:00 
Mathematics 1 12 3: 15- 4: 15 
Mathematics 206 10:30-01:30 
Mathematics 211 (First Semester) 
Mathematics 212 (Second Semester) 
Mathematics 312 11:45-12:45 



8:00-10:15 
8:00-10:15 



44 



SCHEDULE 
OF CLASSES 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 103 (First Semester) 10:30-12:45 

French 104 (Second Semester) 10:30-12:45 

French 201 (First Semester) 8:00-10: 15 

French 202 (Second Semester) 8:00-10:15 

French 407-408 2:00-3:00 

French Reading Monday and Thursday 7:00—9:30 P.M. 

German 153 (First Semester) 9:15-11:30 
German 154 (Second Semester) 9:15-11:30 
German Reading Monday and Thursday 7:00—9:30 P.M. 

Spanish 121 (First Semester) 8:00-10:15 

Spanish 122 (Second Semester) 8:00-10:15 

Spanish 123 (First Semester) 10:30-12:45 

Spanish 124 (Second Semester) 10:30-12:45 

Spanish 219 (First Semester) 2:00- 4:15 

Spanish 220 (Second Semester) 2:00- 4:15 

MUSIC 

Music 111 8:00- 9:00 
Music 112 9:15-10:15 
Music 291 10:30-11:30 



PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 101 2:00- 3:00 

Philosophy 211 8:00- 9:00 

Philosophy 221 10:30-11:30 

Philosophy 304 7:00- 9:30 P.M., M-Th 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 201 9:15-10:15 
Political Science 202 10:30-11:30 
Political Science 301 11:45-12:45 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 201 8:00- 9:00 

Psychology 202 10:30-11:30 

Psychology 301 11:45-12:45 

Psychology 311 9:15-10:15 

Psychology 331 2:00- 3:00 

Psychology 332 3:15- 4:15 

Psychology 362 11:45-12:45 

Psychology 401 8:00- 9:00 



45 



SOCIOLOGY SCHEDULE 

Sociology 201 8:00- 9:00 OF CLASSES 

Sociology 202 9:15-10:15 

Sociology 313 10:30-11:30 

Sociology 402 (First Semester) 2:00-4:15